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Sample Proposals

The following proposals were submitted and accepted for the National Women's Studies Association 2015 conference.

Panel Title: Archives of Queer and Trans Chicana/o Latina/o Desire
Keywords: Queer Theory, Race, Transgender

Rationale
This panel proposes the trans and queer body as archive (Cvetovich 2003) and method for interrogating heteropatriarchal nationalisms and homonational formations (Puar 2007). The three papers on this panel taken together center affect/eros as entry points for examining the precarity of queer and trans* Chicanás and Mexicanás within the historical and cultural imaginaries of heteropatriarchal nationalisms (Perez 1999) and homonationalism that move beyond the boundaries of the nation-state. Using the erotic, love, dolor (pain) and pleasure as sites of inquiry and modes of contestation, the panel explores affective positions that are key to the formation of alternative and decolonial imaginaries.

Works Cited
Cacho, Lisa. Social Death: Racialized Rightlessness and the Criminalization of the Unprotected. New York: New York University Press.
Crawford, Lucas Cassidy. "Transgender without Organs?: Mobilizing a Geo-Affective Theory of Gender Modification." WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly 36.3 (2008): 127-143.
Cvetkovich, Ann. An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003.
Gutierrez, Laura G. Performing Mexicanidad: Vendidas y Cabareteras on the Transnational Stage. Austin, TX: Austin University Press, 2010.
Ferguson, Roderick A. Aberrations in Black: Toward a Queer of Color Critique. University of Minnesota Press, 2003.
Perez, Emma. The Decolonial Imaginary: Writing Chicanas into History. Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press,1999.
Puar, Jasbir. Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalisms in Queer Times. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2007.

A/V Equipment Rationale
Primary objects of analysis are visual images and presenters refer to visual evidence to substantiate arguments. The panel will need an LCD projector to project images of the artwork under discussion.

Individual Paper Title: The Queer Pleasures and Dolor (Pain) of Brown Transmasculinities
Presenter: Francisco Galarte, University of Arizona (Names and affiliations are input separately from the abstracts and rationales in the submissions system and are not visible during the review process)


Abstract
This paper takes up the figure of the “marimacho,” as a site for exploring the pleasures of racialized transmasculinities, and the ways in which trans- as a modality queers the relationship between the sexed body and the gendered subject. The question of the marimacho is indeed a trans- question, intimately related to Ferguson’s suggestion that we should look to trans of color subjects as “sites of knowledge” (2004; 148). What can the destabilization of maleness from Chicano masculinity teach us about the affinities between trans of color and queer of color critique?

Individual Paper Title: Resisting the Erasures of Homonationalism: Archiving and Mapping Queer Brown Los Angeles through Memory, Dreams, and Desire
Presenter: Eddy Francisco Alvarez, SUNY Oneonta (Names and affiliations are input separately from the abstracts and rationales in the submissions system and are not visible during the review process)

Abstract
“Heteronormative ideals pivotal to nation-state formation are now supplemented by homonormativities — what I term homonationalism” (Puar 2007). Following Puar, and other feminist and queer of color scholars, I argue that jotería in Los Angeles are rendered invisible by mainstream homonormative and homonationalist narratives, representing “gay LA” as white, middle-class, and male. I argue that to render these erased lives audible requires what Emma Perez calls the “decolonial imaginary.” Understanding queer and trans bodies as archives, I center jotería dreams, desires, memories and longings, an “archive of feeling” (Cvetovich 2003). In this process we re-imagine, love, mourn and witness each other.

Individual Paper Title: La Virgen de las Panochas: Queer and Lesbian Bodies in the Transborder Archive
Presenter: Cristina Serna, Colgate University (Names and affiliations are input separately from the abstracts and rationales in the submissions system and are not visible during the review process)

Abstract
This paper examines queer Chicana artist Alma Lopez’s "Lupe and Sirena in Love" and the Mexican lesbian feminist collective Las Sucias’ "Virgen de las Panochas." The artworks paired in this analysis invoke the erotic “decolonial imaginary” (Perez 1997) of queer Chicana and Mexican lesbian feminist artists who contest the disciplinary boundaries of heteropatriarchal nationalisms by generating a politicized transborder archive of queer/lesbian erotic expressions. I argue that López and Las Sucias situate the transborder archive within and against the borders of Mexican and Chicana/o nationalist rhetorical dialogues, while grounding their aesthetics in a genealogy of transborder feminist art (Gutierrez 2010).
 



Paper Title: An Interesting Partnership between Two Worlds: The Calgary Stampede Indian Princess at the Interstice of Treaty 7 and the Canadian Settler State
Presenter: Kimberly A. Williams, Mount Royal University (Names and affiliations are input separately from the abstracts and rationales in the submissions system and are not visible during the review process)
Keywords: Colonialism, First Nation, Nationalism
Type of Presenter: Tenured Faculty

Abstract
With Theme #3, “Institutions/Containments,” as its catalyst, this paper explores the contentious relationship between the Canadian settler state and the Treaty 7 First Nations of Southern Alberta as it is maintained and conducted on and through the body of the Calgary Stampede Indian Princess. It asks, “What role does the Calgary Stampede, with its institutionalized forms of racism, hetero/sexism, nationalism and colonialism, in conjunction with the forms of corporeal and psychological containment facilitated by the ‘Indian Princess’ trope, play in re/producing the precarity of Canada’s Indigenous women?”

Works Cited
Berkhofer, Robert. 1979. The Whiteman's Indian: Images of the American Indian from Columbus to the Present. New York: Vintage Books.
Bird, S. Elizabeth. 1996. "Introduction: Constructing the Indian, 1830s-1990s." In Dressing in Feathers: The Construction of the Indian in American Popular Culture, edited by S. Elizabeth Bird, 1-12. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
Bird, S. Elizabeth. 1999. "Gendered Construction of the American Indian in Popular Media." Journal of Communication and Culture (Summer):61-83.
Bowker, G.C., and S.L. Star. 2000. Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences: MIT Press.
Butler, J. 2006. Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence: Verso.
Butler, Judith. 2009. Frames of War: When Is Life Grievable? London: Verso.
Francis, Daniel. 1992. The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture. Vancouver, B.C.: Arsenal Pulp Press.
Green, Rayna. 1975. "The Pocahontas Perplex: The Image of Indian Women in American Culture." The Massachusetts Review 16 (4):698-714.
Huhndorf, Shari M. 2001. Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
Lawrence, Bonita. 2003. "Gender,Race,and the Regulation of Native Identity in Canada and the United States:An Overview." Hypatia 18 (2):3.
Lugones, María. 2010. Toward a Decolonial Feminism. Hypatia 25 (4): 742–59.
Tilton, Robert S. 1994. Pocahontas: The Evolution of an American Narrative. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Rationale
The Calgary Stampede Indian Princess (CSIP) serves throughout her reign, and during Canada’s oldest and largest annual rodeo, as a cultural ambassador representing Alberta’s Treaty 7 First Nations to a largely non-Indigenous audience. Conceptualizing the CSIP as a precarious boundary object for a number of discordant stakeholders (Bowker and Star 1999, Butler 2006 and Butler 2010), this paper explores the ways in which the corporeal body of the CSIP is positioned differentially within hierarchies of power, one colonial, the other decolonial, but both nationalist nonetheless.

In addition to addressing the under-researched topic of the CSIP, this paper is significant in its mobilization of intersectional, gender-based analysis informed by feminist theories of gender and nationalism and critical race theory, particularly with regard to stereotypes of North American indigenous peoples (see Green 1975, Berkhofer 1979, Francis 1992, Tilton 1994, Bird 1996, Bird 1999, Huhndorf 2001 and Lawrence 2003).

I argue that the CSIP serves a unifying political function by smoothing over longstanding conflicts between local First Nations and Southern Alberta’s increasingly diverse settler community. As a result, the Canadian nationalist narrative celebrating the “orderly” settlement of the West is writ large on and through the body of the CSIP as a physical manifestation of the success of Canadian colonialism.

But since the CSIP is intended also to be a role model for young First Nations women, she plays a countercultural and potentially decolonial role, which troubles the stabilizing meanings attached to her by both the Treaty 7 Nations and the Calgary Stampede.

A/V Equipment Rationale
I have several photographs and short videos of the CSIP and from the Calgary Stampede that are instrumental in demonstrating her precarious role as cultural ambassador from Treaty 7 to the Stampede's largely non-Indigenous audience.
 

Roundtable Title  Creating Women’s and Gender Studies Publics:  Containments within and Seepages beyond the Field-Imaginary
Keywords:: ACADEMIA, WOMEN'S STUDIES, THEORY
Options: WS Program Director or similar
Audio Visual Requests: No Audio Visual Equipment Required

Rationale: Although the "field-imaginary" of Women's and Gender Studies (WGS) is like those of other identity-based disciplines in that its practitioners often "find their critical authority at odds with their public influence...and take their abjection of their public political sphere as evidence of their political value" (Wiegman 2012, 16-17), this roundtable nevertheless seeks to locate a diverse set of projects that momentarily exceed, delicately sidestep, or ever-so-slightly seep out of the disciplinary boundaries that demand political abjection. We seek, in other words, to create more expansive understandings of Women’s and Gender Studies publics. Granted, such attempts often raise questions by other WGS stakeholders as to whether what we are doing is the real labor of the discipline. And, no doubt for us, those questions remain open as we think about—and rethink—the stakes of stepping outside the field’s mandates. In this roundtable, we seek to provoke discussion about how WGS practitioners might reimagine the limits of our own field-imaginary. Topics we bring to this discussion include: WGS textbooks and programs that don't focus on feminism, feminist engagements with genetic explanations of human differences, defying “gender equality perspectives” in teaching about sex work advocacy, and funding WGS work through appeals to evangelical/conservative audiences. In each case, members of the roundtable seek to engage the political stakes of creating more expansive WGS publics.

Works Cited: Edelman, Lee. No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive. Durham: Duke UP, 2004. Hemmings, Clare. Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory. Durham: Duke UP, 2011. Kafer, Allison. Feminist, Queer, Crip. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2013. Warner, Michael. Publics and Counterpublics. NY: Zone Books, 2005. Wiegman, Robyn. Object Lessons. Durham: Duke UP, 2012.

Abstract: Although WGS’s "field-imaginary" often takes its own “abjection [from] the public political sphere as evidence of [its] political value" (Wiegman. Object Lessons), this roundtable nevertheless seeks to locate  a diverse set of projects that momentarily exceed, delicately sidestep, or ever-so-slightly seep out of the disciplinary boundaries of political abjection. We seek, in other words, to create WGS publics. Topics include: WGS textbooks and programs that don't focus on feminism, feminist engagements with genetic explanations of human differences, defying “gender equality perspectives” in teaching about sex work advocacy, and funding WGS work through appeals to evangelical/conservative audiences.

Participants*: (Session Organizer) Catherine Orr, Beloit College; (Presenter) Catherine Orr, Beloit College; (Presenter) Ann Braithwaite, University of Prince Edward Island; (Presenter) Karlyn Crowley, St Norbert College; (Presenter) Annalee Lepp, Gender Studies, University of Victoria; (Presenter) Alison Piepmeier, College of Charleston; (Presenter) Christopher Korey, College of Charleston; (Moderator) Courtney Patterson, Northwestern University
*Names and affiliations are input separately from the abstracts and rationales in the submissions system and are not visible during the review process